Communications in transition – the continuing need for dialogue

The third of my columns for Stage, Screen and Radio, the quarterly journal of BECTU, the union for creative ambition, appeared in the Autumn 2019 issue (‘Celebrating Young Creatives’). Members of BECTU can download the magazine from the website – I’m on p. 24. Now the Winter issue has hit the streets, I thought it was about time to re-publish the text of #3, minus Tony Kelly‘s cartoon pointing up my words. Not a member of the union and want to see the text in all its glory? Here’s how to join.

For 15 years now, Ofcom – the regulator for the communications industry – has published an annual overview of the state of things in its Communications Market Report. This has always been required reading for its broad-sweeping analysis and its essential facts and figures on what remains a rapidly changing industry. Continuing a trend began last year, though, it is now truer to say that it’s required viewing: the comprehensive report of yore has gone the way of ‘big data’ with the 2019 CMR now consisting of a set of charts, each accompanied by a ‘key message’ bullet point.

A picture might well be worth 1,000 words – but art consisting of little more than graphics is going to leave the reviewer somewhat unfulfilled. It might suit the view that today’s wealth of access to news, stories, comment and images, along with too little time, has left us with the attention span of a goldfish. Or that, to capture people’s attention in these days, you have to hit them up with something punchy and direct. I don’t necessarily buy either one, although there are elements of truth in both. More prosaically, the reason for the switch is likely to be a lack of available resources. And that’s a shame.

Some of the key points to emerge from the 2019 CMR are:

  • telecoms prices and revenues continue to fall in real terms
  • there is a continued shift away from fixed-line to mobiles for telephone calls; and from mobile to web-based messaging services for text communications
  • revenues are static for commercial TV broadcasters, amidst a reduction in advertising revenues associated with a drop in viewing hours
  • public service broadcasters continue to spend less on generating new UK content (excepting the effects of the 2018 World Cup)
  • the reach for radio remains high and the time we spend listening to the radio nevertheless remains the same year-on-year, while digital radio broadcasting continues to expand.

Right across communications, the internet continues to wreak (creative) havoc. Telecoms companies and TV and radio broadcasters alike are facing continued declines in revenues while somehow justifying the substantial investment required, whether this lies in generating new content or in the pipes and airwaves that carry that content to us, at home or on the move. Rightly, we expect that experience to be seamless and to deliver us the same quality wherever we are even though we have been enticed into a world in which we expect to pay increasingly less for it.

Substantial investment is taking place, of course: in telecoms, more and more fixed broadband connections are ‘superfast’ and more of us are on faster mobile connections.

But investors demand both absolute dividends and predictability in them over time. And, when revenues are declining and there are plenty of free-riders around, continuing that level of share-out can only come from squeezing more and more out of workers whether this be in terms of effort or in terms of demands for further and greater concessions in our terms and conditions of employment.

Indeed, the share of national income going to workers continues to fall, with impacts in left-behind communities and in more of us in work feeling the pinch. And, when more of us are in work than ever, that’s a disgrace.

Just as in the transition to a low-carbon world, workers in communications are in transition too. This presents difficulties, and these can only be confronted, and resolved, through dialogue. In organised trade unions, we are not only aware of the importance of this, but we have the opportunity to do something about it. However, the message of dialogue needs to be more widely understood if workers are to start increasing their share.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s