TotW: The Bamboos – Ride on Time

Black Box’s ‘Ride On Time’ was a game-changer when it came out in 1989. Sampling was already being done – M|A|R|R|S’s ‘Pump Up The Volume’ was a massive hit two years earlier, illustrating the power of cutting and splicing tracks against a beat, and the same sample which Black Box had used had featured on Samantha Fox’s ‘I Wanna Have Some Fun’, a track which somehow, curiously, passed me by at the time, one year previously. What we now know as electronic dance music was experiencing its first flourishing as house music coming out of the Chicago scene, led by Farley ‘Jackmaster’ Funk’s beat tracks and the DJ International label; and the second summer of love had just gone by. Grandmaster Flash’s ‘The Message’ was as early as 1982 and Public Enemy’s ‘Yo! Bum Rush The Show’ was released in 1987 and hip-hop was a familiar face by the end of the decade.

There was, to coin a phrase, nothing that was particularly new about Black Box’s ‘Ride On Time’; the ground – if not that well-trodden – had at least been well-prepared.

What was different about it was firstly the technology – Black Box (a team of three Italian DJs and producers) had bought a sampler which allowed them to remix live in clubs, although it wasn’t capable of storing more than three vocal snippets at once; and secondly that they took an identifiable sequence of notes, literally a few seconds of vocal and the song’s essential hook, from a single, existing song and, cutting and re-cutting it repeatedly into different combinations, made a whole new song out of it, threading everything together with an insistent piano rhythm which marked their genre. In the process, they raised arguments about ownership, royalties and copyright which were not unfamiliar ones either when artists were sued for copyright infringements – or when, conversely, they elected not to do so – but which had rarely, if ever, previously aired quite as intensely or as controversially as this.

Thirdly, of course, they made something which not only came later to symbolise the euphoria of the time but something which was also, through its visceral physicality, quite firmly grounded. ‘Ride On Time’ was a remarkable song whose ground-breaking nature lay not in that it was new, but that it was possessed of enormous strength, a life force capable of splitting atoms and an astonishing vibrancy which was perfectly in tune with its time. Listening to it now is not only to be reminded of those times but to be reminded of the song’s sheer presence although very little of its essential spirit actually came from Black Box themselves.

The song which they used was originally a 1980 track by Dan Hartman called ‘Love Sensation’, written for disco singer Loleatta Holloway. The full story – quite well-known now, of course – is well set out by Terry Matthew in an article for Chicago house specialist magazine 5mag.net, setting the song against the background of Hartman’s life and career, building in also aspects of Holloway’s own, while Black Box have also given lengthy, and similar, interviews to DJ Mag and to NME coinciding with a 30th anniversary remix they gave the song in 2019, essentially taking it back to its 70s disco roots.

Essentially, ‘Love Sensation’ was one-half of a swap deal which saw Holloway contribute a brief, but barnstorming, vocal contribution to Hartman’s own ‘Relight My Fire’ (if you know the Take That version, think (evidently) Lulu’s contribution but multiply by ten) while Hartman wrote and produced ‘Love Sensation’ for an album that Holloway was working on. She later reported that Hartman made her sing ‘Love Sensation’ 29 times before the final take, wanting deliberately to run her vocal chords ragged to get that note of on-the-edge desperation to the delivery of her lines which is both the song’s hallmark as well as the physical power base which Black Box took. Ultimately, Holloway was apparently aided by coffee sweetened with Vick’s VaporRub. However, the song immediately fell to obscurity – by the time it came out, disco was in its death throes in the US and the industry was experiencing an unprecedented, unheralded and unwanted backlash – being ignored on the crossover pop charts and spending no more than one week at No. 1 even on the specialist dance charts.

If you don’t know ‘Love Sensation’ – or especially if you know it only through ‘Ride on Time’ or one of the more than 30 other tracks which have sampled it amidst the more than 300 samples which have been built on Holloway’s work – do check it out: divorced from the chopped repetition of the samples on ‘Ride On Time’, and sustained over the course of a whole song which has a start, a middle and an end, it is noticeable that Holloway’s performance on the song is varied, being blisteringly raw and possessed of quite extraordinary physical power and emotional intensity at some points as well as moments of soaring sweetness at others. Despite whatever else was going on in the music industry at the time, this deserved to be a huge hit.

Note, if you will, the relative play counts: 84k for ‘Love Sensation’ (there are actually several versions of the original floating around but nothing more than this, I don’t think); while the official Black Box video for ‘Ride On Time’ has some 17m.

Not expecting much to come out of their own work in putting their track together other than for local kids, Black Box didn’t seek any sort of clearances, but the song became a huge hit in the UK and right across Europe following UK DJs Paul Oakenfold and Danny Rampling travelling to Italy in search of Italo house music, a niche but growing sub-genre, for their gigs and shows, and landing heavily on it, buying up all available copies. The UK label to which Black Box eventually released the song once the level of demand had been realised late that summer had also told them they would secure clearance although a legal dispute between record companies meant this had not been fully resolved. The rest is history. While Dan Hartman’s observation on hearing ‘Ride On Time’ was the laconic ‘I think I wrote it’, followed by legal action, Holloway was deeply dismayed, traumatised and bitter, regarding that her work had been taken without credit and later confessing that it had brought her close to a nervous breakdown. Scared by the furore, Black Box quickly re-cut the track, it seems with future M People singer Heather Small, also originally uncredited, albeit with somewhat mixed results. A video hastily shot for the song featured an Italian model, who didn’t speak English, lip-synching to Holloway’s words which, unfamiliar a process as it was at the time, poured oil on the flames already consuming her: not only had they stolen her voice, they had traded her image in for a younger, skinnier version physically incapable of generating Holloway’s power.

Hartman’s legal action ended with him making a friendly and generous gesture of a one-third share of the royalties, when he could have had the lot; Holloway, however, never received a penny since her label, Salsoul, owned the rights to her studio work although publishing has, since those times, credited her on the song as ‘feat. Loleatta Holloway’ in a style that is now familiar. Given that ‘Ride On Time’ is stamped right through with her – her presence, her aura and her labour – she ought to have been properly recognised for it at the time (as she had been through samples done earlier by DJ International) and certainly she ought to have had a better share of the proceeds than the fur coat she is said to have been furnished with while being prevented from speaking badly about it in public. Black Box bought out those rights in 2018; Holloway had died in 2011. Sad on so many levels.

Now, however, nine-piece Melbourne funksters The Bamboos have bravely taken on the impossible by covering ‘Ride On Time’, mondegreen and all, as the ‘B’-side of their new single, arising out of some studio session work for their forthcoming LP (due out early next month). The tune had cropped up on some 90s music which the band was listening to while relaxing between takes. A suggestion and a nervous laugh later, and the musicians accepted the challenge. Just to be clear: what we have here is a band covering a track that was itself little more than a few seconds of snatched sample, but as a fully-fledged song in its own right. I’m sure m’lords back at Rough Trade were all over this and it’s well worth checking out as a track of the week:

For those keeping a watch on these things it’s notable that this is already not far short of 20k plays. Without much of a current presence on Bandcamp – though The Bamboos do have something out for Record Store Day this year – this is one you’ll need to pick up from your local record shop (happily now open again) – it’s out as a 7″ on Rough Trade (PT009) or direct via The Bamboos’ website store.

At a time when live music needs all the help it can get, it’s great to see a working band cover a song originally made in the studio out of pre-recorded clips. It’s also great to see The Bamboos already out on the road in Australia; it’s a hopeful sign that these times might, one day, come our way again, too.

It’s not so much a cover as a necessary reinterpretation of Black Box’s original confection. Wisely, The Bamboos use the crisp brassiness of the horn section to do the heavy lifting on some of the more blistering elements of how Black Box’s sampling and sequencing made Holloway’s voice appear, while band vocalist Kylie Auldist, capable of mixing it with anyone among her contemporaries for vocal power (check out also her work on ‘Hard Up’, the A-side) but who also knows when to exercise restraint, sensibly chooses not to try and out-Loleatta Loleatta Holloway while nevertheless ensuring the song has the gritty kick it needs to retain its emotional punch. The production has a wonderful amount of space in it, allowing all the instruments room to breathe and in sharp contrast to the tightly claustrophobic atmosphere set down in the Black Box original. The drums, at the fore throughout, send you skittering for cover, the guitars lay down a funky bottom line to set your hips shaking and the brief organ break, which re-states Black Box’s own vital contribution (the piano hook) and gives the space from which Kylie leads the charge home, is a surprise and a delight. The horns win the right to finish the song and the few moments of quiet after the fade reminds the listener of the need to breathe again. Enormous fun. Grab your share!

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